Resources for Beginning Meditation

Over the years, I’ve listened to and read a lot of books on meditation (because, you know, reading and thinking about something is almost like really doing it ;)).

These are my top three books/audiobooks for Meditation for Beginners (and I do think we’re beginners for a very long time).

The beginner’s guide to meditation by Shinzen Young

Shinzen Young is my main meditation teacher because of his clarity in vocabulary and ability to explain abstract concepts in concrete terms.

The beginner's guide to meditation by Shinzen Young

The beginner’s guide to meditation by Shinzen Young

This book introduces the listener to the tradition of meditation. Explains how meditation works, what different methods offer, and guides the listener through the practices. Includes a 3-part session for beginners.

Meditation for Beginners by Jack Kornfield

Jack Kornfield is a teacher with deep knowledge in both Eastern meditation and Western psychology. His teaching is packed full of wisdom.

Meditation for Beginners by Jack Kornfield

Meditation for Beginners by Jack Kornfield

This book introduction to a form of meditation drawing on Buddhist practices. Covers: daily exercises; body postures and breathing; clearing distractions and cultivating awareness; the energy of love as a healing power; how to “make friends” with anger; the importance of forgiveness; how to focus healing attention on the body.

The posture of meditation : a practical manual for meditators of all traditions by Will Johnson

Many guides on meditation do not discuss How To Sit, but the proper posture is the base for any kind of meditative work, so this little book is highly recommended.

The posture of meditation by Will Johnson

The posture of meditation by Will Johnson

“Ordinarily,” Johnson opens his superbly calm little manual, “we think of meditation as an activity involving our minds, but in truth meditation is initiated by assuming a specific gesture with our bodies.” That gesture or posture is the cross-legged sitting familiarly associated with Buddhist meditation and consists of three elements: alignment, relaxation, and resilience.

The objects of these physical practices are to offer gravity the least resistance while in an alert yet resting state and to experience the subtle movements of existence. Johnson explains the functions of each element, offers instruction and advice on achieving each of them, and discusses how they may be carried into everyday life in a prose so limpidly intelligent that this book may become a standard text for beginning meditators. – Ray Olson, Booklist

How about you? What are some meditation resources that you have enjoyed?